Paper Towns

PaperTowns

“Margo always loved mysteries. And in everything that came afterward, I could never stop thinking that maybe she loved mysteries so much that she became one.” – Quentin Jacobsen

Everyone loves a good mystery. I don’t say that as merely an intro to draw you in, I mean that as an actual fact. Agatha Christie is the world’s best-selling author and what was her subject matter? Oh right, she wrote mystery novels. Like I said, mystery novels, everyone loves them. So when Quentin Jacobsen, the main character of Paper Towns, has his next door neighbor leave a mystery in his hands to try and track her down, he dives headlong into the search. Margo Roth Spiegelman was always a fascination for Quentin. Living next to each other their whole lives lead Quentin to fall head over heels in love with Margo and, even though she was unattainable for him, he always kept an eye on her. So when she shows up in his bedroom in the middle of the night to take him on an adventure full of risk and revenge, he is swept away, overcoming his nervous hesitation to follow the girl of his dreams. But, once Margo disappears and Quentin begins to search for her, he learns more and more about this girl he loved, seeing the true Margo Roth Spiegelman hidden underneath a suburban facade.

Paper Towns is a novel of discovery and John Green has crafted some very intriguing characters with depth. Instead of the usual bildungsroman story of the protagonist’s struggle to find self, Quentin actually spends more time trying to discover who Margo is than he does himself. Green has made Margo into an enigma, on the outside, she is a bubbly popular high school senior, but underneath that faux high school sheen is a complicated girl seeking attention. As Quentin discovers more about her, he learns the deeper hidden truths of who Margo Roth Spiegelman really is. This journey is quite interesting, because as he discovers more about her, he discovers more about himself. He begins to understand where he stands in the high school echelon of people, as well as where he stands as a risk taker and as a planner for the future.

In the end, Paper Towns is a story of relationships that touches on themes of parental neglect and a need for attention, the discovery of love and the strengthening of friendships. The cast of characters that are Quentin and his friends show their differences, but also show how they must rely on each other to survive. The comparison of Quentin’s healthy relationship with his parents and Margo’s broken one with hers highlights the need for a strong family connection that is based on trust and respect. Green has done a wonderful job of placing these characters in a story that allows them to each be unique, but remain vital to the telling of the story and the interconnectedness of the relationships.

If it was not clear yet, I really enjoyed Paper Towns. There were some laugh out loud moments and Green’s jokes fit my humor well, which means there were some somewhat childish jokes that Quentin and his friends rattled off. This is also one of the reasons why I would recommend it only for grades 11 and 12 because there is some string language and some silly, but inappropriate moments in the story. The coming-of-age story combined with the stories of relationships make it an engaging read that students could dig into. It may also spur students to explore new music and poetry, as older writers are mentioned in the story. As for Lit Circles, I would pair it with Laura Halse Andersen’s Twisted, Green’s own Looking for Alaska, or Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, as they all deal with the coming-of-age story but each follows a unique path to self-discovery. Paper Towns is one of John Green’s best novels and a great read for fans of mysteries.

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