World War Z

World War Z Cover

“The only rule that ever made sense to me I learned from a history, not an economics, professor at Wharton. “Fear,” he used to say, “fear is the most valuable commodity in the universe.” That blew me away. “Turn on the TV,” he’d say. “What are you seeing? People selling their products? No. People selling the fear of you having to live without their products.” [Effin’] A, was he right. Fear of aging, fear of loneliness, fear of poverty, fear of failure. Fear is the most basic emotion we have. Fear is primal. Fear sells.”

Historical fiction is often an interesting genre for literature. Basing a story in a past and playing with the history a bit, perhaps manipulating it to fit the story, an author can create a beautiful story that the reader can relate to. These books may bring accounts of real life situations into the story and can be told from the perspective of those in the heat of the battle. In my opinion, Max Brooks’ World War Z is a piece of historical fiction, albeit a fictitious history. World War Z is an oral history of the zombie apocalypse on earth, told from the perspective of survivors from around the world. It is a very intriguing book, as it details the story of the outbreak of a zombie plague that surrounds the world and how each area of the world dealt with each phase of the plague’s spreading and ultimate defeat.

Using multiple perspectives on similar events makes a fantastic story weaved together with elegance. Brooks uses several different voices that each present haunting stories that reveal government cover ups, issues with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and lost loved ones. But Brooks also includes the beauty in humanity, with stories of collaboration, grit in the face of adversity, and hope for the future. It is a story with many themes and many angles that provides several different ways a teacher could employ it in their classroom. And the way that Brooks weaves it all together from an oral-historical perspective, makes World War Z a unique story of survival.

The unique way in which World War Z is told makes in an extremely engaging story. The interviewer/interviewee style makes it feel like the stories coming from the people are real, instead of just some fictitious story. However, there is some strong language and some haunting scenes  in this book and I would only recommend this book for grade 12 students. The most apparent theme, humanity and the human reaction to challenge, is very compelling and harkens back to books like Lord of the Flies or 1984. It is a book with many different themes and ideas so it leaves many opportunities for students to provide written responses. I would pair this book with Pat Barker’s Regeneration, Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried, or Timothy Findley’s The Wars, as they all deal with PTSD, the issues of seeing horrors first-hand, and the brokenness of war. World War Z is one of the most creative zombie apocalypse books I have ever read and it is an extremely engaging read.

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